In Memorium 1990's

This page is in memory of some of those who passed from 1990 to 1999. Please pause a moment to reflect.

Madeline Kahn

1942 - 1999

Madeline Kahn (September 29, 1942 – December 3, 1999) was an American actress, comedienne and singer. She was best known for her comedic roles in such films as Blazing Saddles, Paper Moon, Young Frankenstein, History of the World, Part I, What's Up, Doc?, and Clue.

Deforest Kelley

1920 - 1999

Jackson DeForest Kelley (January 20, 1920 – June 11, 1999) was an American actor, screenwriter, poet and singer known for his iconic roles in Westerns and as Dr. Leonard "Bones" McCoy of the USS Enterprise in the television and film series Star Trek.

Michael Craze

1942 - 1998

Michael Craze (29 November 1942 – 8 December 1998) was a British actor noted for his role of Ben Jackson, a companion of the Doctor, in the long-running BBC science fiction television series Doctor Who. He played the part from 1966 to 1967 alongside both William Hartnell and Patrick Troughton.

John Denver

1943 - 1997

John Denver, John Henry Deutschendorf Jr (December 31, 1943 – October 12, 1997) was one of the most popular acoustic artists of the 1970s in terms of record sales, recording and releasing around 300 songs, of which about 200 were composed by him. He was named Poet Laureate of Colorado in 1977. Songs such as "Leaving on a Jet Plane" (1967), "Take Me Home, Country Roads" (1971), "Rocky Mountain High" (1972), "Sunshine on My Shoulders" (1973), "Thank God I'm a Country Boy" (1974), "Annie's Song" (1974), and "Calypso" (1975) are popular worldwide. Denver has been referred to as "The Poet for the Planet", "Mother Nature's Son" (based on The Beatles song he covered) and "A Song's Best Friend."

Adrienne Hill

1937 - 1997

Adrienne Hill (22 July 1937 – 6 October 1997) was an English actress. In 1965, she appeared in the BBC science fiction television series Doctor Who as Katarina, a companion of the Doctor—who at that time was played by William Hartnell. Katarina was the first companion to be killed in the series, and her tenure in the show was brief—appearing in only five episodes over two serials: The Myth Makers and The Daleks' Master Plan. This was Hill's first work in television. Katarina's death was actually the first scene that she played.

Jimmy Stewart

1908 - 1997

James Maitland "Jimmy" Stewart (May 20, 1908 – July 2, 1997) was an American film and stage actor, best known for his self-effacing persona. Over the course of his career, he starred in many films widely considered classics and was nominated for five Academy Awards, winning one in competition and receiving one Lifetime Achievement award. He was a major MGM contract star. He also had a noted military career, a WWII and Vietnam War veteran, who rose to the rank of Brigadier General in the United States Air Force Reserve.

Harry Blackstone Jr.

1934 - 1997

Harry Blackstone, Jr. (June 30, 1934 – May 14, 1997) was an American stage magician, author, and television performer. He was born in Three Rivers, Michigan, the son of noted stage magician Harry Blackstone, Sr. (also known as "The Great Blackstone"). As an infant, he was used in his father's act. Rather than utilize the routines his father developed, Blackstone developed his own and modernized his performance, though onstage he would on occasion perform a sequence of his father's illusions in a period setting.

Carl Sagan

1934 - 1996

Carl Edward Sagan (November 9, 1934 – December 20, 1996) was an American astronomer, astrophysicist, cosmologist, author and highly successful science popularizer and science communicator in the space and natural sciences. During his lifetime, he published more than 600 scientific papers and popular articles and was author, co-author, or editor of more than 20 books. In his works, he advocated skeptical inquiry and the scientific method. He pioneered exobiology and promoted the Search for Extra-Terrestrial Intelligence (SETI).

Jon Pertwee

1919 - 1996

John Devon Roland Pertwee (7 July 1919 – 20 May 1996) was an English actor. Pertwee is best known for a series of famous roles, firstly his 18-year stint on BBC Radio as Chief Petty Officer Pertwee in The Navy Lark, secondly his role in the BBC science fiction television series Doctor Who, in which he played the third incarnation of the Doctor from 1970 to 1974 and thirdly as the title character in the series Worzel Gummidge.

Mclean Stevenson

1927 - 1996

Edgar McLean Stevenson Jr. (November 14, 1927 – February 15, 1996) was an American actor most recognized for his role as Lt. Colonel Henry Blake on the TV series M*A*S*H. He was also recognized for his role as Michael Nicholson on The Doris Day Show.

Wolfman Jack

1938 - 1995

Robert Weston Smith, known as Wolfman Jack (January 21, 1938 – July 1, 1995) was a gravelly voiced American disc jockey, famous in the 1960s and 1970s.

Elizabeth Montgomery

1933 - 1995

Elizabeth Victoria Montgomery (April 15, 1933 – May 18, 1995) was an American film and television actress whose career spanned five decades. She is probably best remembered as the star of the TV series Bewitched.

Dick Sargent

1930 - 1994

Richard Stanford Cox (April 19, 1930 – July 8, 1994), known professionally as Dick Sargent, was an American actor, notable as the second actor to portray Darrin Stephens on the television series Bewitched. The actor took the name Dick Sargent from a Saturday Evening Post illustrator/artist of the same name.

George Peppard

1928 - 1994

George Peppard Jr. (October 1, 1928 – May 8, 1994) was an American film and television actor.

Peppard secured a major role when he starred alongside Audrey Hepburn in Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961), and later portrayed a character based on Howard Hughes in The Carpetbaggers (1964). On television, he played the title role of millionaire insurance investigator and sleuth Thomas Banacek in the early-1970s mystery series Banacek. He played Col. John "Hannibal" Smith, the cigar-smoking leader of a renegade commando squad, in the hit 1980s action show The A-Team.


John Candy

1950 - 1994

John Franklin Candy (October 31, 1950 – March 4, 1994) was a Canadian actor and comedian who rose to fame as a member of the Toronto branch of The Second City and its related Second City Television series, and through his appearances in comedy films such as Stripes, Splash, Cool Runnings, Summer Rental, The Great Outdoors, Spaceballs, and Uncle Buck. One of his most renowned onscreen performances was as Del Griffith, the loquacious, on-the-move shower-curtain ring salesman in the John Hughes comedy Planes, Trains and Automobiles. While filming the Western parody Wagons East!, Candy died of a heart attack in his sleep in Durango, Mexico, at the age of 43. His final two films, Wagons East! and Canadian Bacon, are dedicated to his memory.

Vincent Price

1911 - 1993

Vincent Leonard Price, Jr. (May 27, 1911 – October 25, 1993) was an American actor, well known for his distinctive voice and serio-comic performances in a series of horror films made in the latter part of his career.

Fred Gwynne

1926 - 1993

Frederick Hubbard Gwynne (July 10, 1926 – July 2, 1993) was an American actor, artist and author. Gwynne was best known for his roles in the 1960s sitcoms Car 54, Where Are You? and The Munsters, as well as his later roles in The Cotton Club, Pet Sematary and My Cousin Vinny.

Jacqueline Hill

1929 - 1993

Jacqueline Hill (17 December 1929—18 February 1993) was a British actress known for her role as Barbara Wright in the BBC science-fiction television series Doctor Who. As the history teacher of Susan Foreman, the Doctor's granddaughter, Barbara was the first Doctor Who companion to appear on-screen in 1963, with Hill speaking the series' first words. She played the role for nearly two years, leaving the series in 1965 at the same time as fellow actor William Russell (who played the companion Ian Chesterton). Hill returned to Doctor Who in 1980 for an appearance in the serial Meglos, as the Tigellan priestess Lexa.

Magnus Pyke

1908 - 1992

Dr. Magnus Alfred Pyke (Paddington, London, 29 December 1908 — 19 October 1992) was a British scientist and media figure, who, although apparently quite eccentric and playing up to the mad scientist stereotype, succeeded in explaining science to a lay audience. He was known for his enthusiastic way of waving his arms around as he spoke.

Pyke appears on the pop song, and the video, "She Blinded Me With Science" by Thomas Dolby, where he shouts "science" and provides other sound bites. After the video was released, he was said to be annoyed by people coming up to him and shouting "Science!" at him. His eccentric brand of humour was often heard after dinner at the Savage Club.


Isaac Asimov

1920 - 1992

Isaac Asimov (January 2, 1920 – April 6, 1992) was an American author and professor of biochemistry at Boston University, best known for his works of science fiction and for his popular science books. Asimov was one of the most prolific writers of all time, having written or edited more than 500 books and an estimated 9,000 letters and postcards. His works have been published in nine of the ten major categories of the Dewey Decimal System (The sole exception being the 100s: philosophy and psychology, although he did write a foreword for The Humanist way, which is published in the 100s).

Isaac Asimov is widely considered a master of hard science fiction and, along with Robert A. Heinlein and Arthur C. Clarke, he was considered one of the "Big Three" science fiction writers during his lifetime. Asimov's most famous work is the Foundation Series; his other major series are the Galactic Empire series and the Robot series, both of which he later tied into the same fictional universe as the Foundation Series to create a unified "future history" for his stories much like those pioneered by Robert A. Heinlein and previously produced by Cordwainer Smith and Poul Anderson. He penned numerous short stories, among them "Nightfall", which in 1964 was voted by the Science Fiction Writers of America the best short science fiction story of all time. Asimov wrote the Lucky Starr series of juvenile science-fiction novels using the pen name Paul French.

The prolific Asimov also wrote mysteries and fantasy, as well as much non-fiction. Most of his popular science books explain scientific concepts in a historical way, going as far back as possible to a time when the science in question was at its simplest stage. He often provides nationalities, birth dates, and death dates for the scientists he mentions, as well as etymologies and pronunciation guides for technical terms. Examples include his Guide to Science, the three volume set Understanding Physics, Asimov's Chronology of Science and Discovery, as well as numerous works on astronomy, mathematics, the Bible, William Shakespeare's works and, of course, chemistry subjects.


Dick York

1928 - 1992

Richard Allen York, known as Dick York (September 4, 1928 – February 20, 1992), was an American actor. He is best remembered for his role as the first Darrin Stephens on the ABC television fantasy sitcom, Bewitched. His best known motion picture role was as teacher Bertram Cates in the 1960 film Inherit the Wind.

Natalie Schafer

1900-1991

Natalie Schafer (November 5, 1900 – April 10, 1991) was an American actress, best known as "Lovey" Wentworth Howell on CBS's sitcom Gilligan's Island (1964–67).

David White

1916 - 1990

David White (April 4, 1916 – November 27, 1990) was an American stage, film and television actor best known for playing Larry Tate, the boss of Darrin Stephens on the 1964–72 situation comedy Bewitched.

Alan Hale Jr.

1921-1990

Alan Hale Jr. (born Alan Hale MacKahan, March 8, 1921 – January 2, 1990) was an American film, stage, character and television actor and restaurateur. Hale Jr. was the son of character actor Alan Hale Sr.[2] Hale Jr.'s television career, which spanned four decades, was most noted for his co-starring role in the 1960s series Gilligan's Island. He also appeared on several talk and variety shows.